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by:Marslite     2019-10-13
Joanne and Alan Stichbury are both involved in the world of drama.
The front door of Frances Liteman/Victorian Colonial Arts and Crafts-
The stylish home in James Bay can see the spacious porch outside and the elegant staircase inside.
Designer Bruce Wilkin says the former kitchen is \"closed \".
\"Now it\'s very spacious and there\'s an island that separates it from the family room.
Complex and simple at the same time, it is quite dramatic with hidden shelf lighting.
Quite Amish simple.
Designer Bruce Wilkin said: \"The previous kitchen of Frances Litterman/Victorian colonists was\" closed \".
\"Now it\'s very spacious and there\'s an island that separates it from the family room.
Complex and simple at the same time, it is quite dramatic with hidden shelf lighting.
Quite Amish simple.
On the open shelves of the kitchen, Frances Litterman/Victorian colonial bowl is placed.
The large restaurant can accommodate parties of 20 or more people.
Additional dishes were arranged on the plate track, which was a long board that Alan found at the logging ground, giving Joanne a gift for Mother\'s Day.
There is a strong bowl of Martha on the table of the French baker.
Alan made the table with a part of the recycling bookcase and legs he found on the second table
Hand shops in Ontario.
The large restaurant can accommodate parties of 20 or more people.
Additional dishes were arranged on the plate track, which was a long board that Alan found at the logging ground, giving Joanne a gift for Mother\'s Day.
There is a strong bowl of Martha on the table of the French baker.
Alan made the table with a part of the recycling bookcase and legs he found on the second table
Hand shops in Ontario.
The large restaurant can accommodate parties of 20 or more people.
Additional dishes were arranged on the plate track, which was a long board that Alan found at the logging ground, giving Joanne a gift for Mother\'s Day.
There is a strong bowl of Martha on the table of the French baker.
Alan made the table with a part of the recycling bookcase and legs he found on the second table
Hand shops in Ontario.
Frances Litman/Victoria Times colonial the house has three fireplaces, and although this fireplace in the front room burns wood, the two fireplaces have been converted to gas.
Joanne\'s mat, like another Martha\'s solid bowl on the wall, creates a vivid scene.
The main bathroom upstairs has a bright ceiling, hand made cabinets and Calacatta marble floor.
They chose this marble because it was whiter, bolder, and more textured and eye-catching than Carrera.
\"We want to introduce more yellow, gray and brown,\" Allen said . \" A year ago, the walls were green and everything was at an angle, he added.
The upstairs dressing room was bright and airy with scarves and plenty of clothing in the bowl.
Thanks to a part made by Allen, it can be used as a guest room with Suede on it
Look at micro fiber
Like in the living room.
Frances Litterman/Victorian colonists behind the main bed are Christmas cards from Bill West, one of Alan\'s former teachers.
Each bedroom and family room has a fan that keeps the house cool during the hot summer and flows the air.
The dressing room downstairs has Metro tiles and golden walls, just like the main bathroom ceiling, but the marble floor is cut with a smaller square, consistent with the smaller size.
Frances Litterman/Victorian colonists behind the main bed are Christmas cards from Bill West, one of Alan\'s former teachers.
Each bedroom and family room has a fan that keeps the house cool during the hot summer and flows the air.
Francis Liteman/Victorian colonists Joanne and Alan Stichbury are both involved in the world of drama.
Frances Litterman/Victorian colonies Joanne and Alan Stichbury have a popular backyard in the 1907 house in James Bay, with a low maintenance area and most importantly
Frances Litterman/Victorian colonies Joanne and Alan Stichbury have a popular backyard in the 1907 house in James Bay, with a low maintenance area and most importantly
For 35 years, Alan Stichbury has designed great views and lighting effects.
From New York to Bangkok to Canada, Victoria\'s professor of theater has created wonderful scenes for opera and drama.
His wife Joanne was equally creative.
She has been stitching the storm with clever hands and extreme tailoring talents to make costumes for Shaw and strafus festivals, theaters from coast to coast, film industry and Pacific Opera Victoria.
But when renovating the 1907 homes recently purchased in James Bay, the two decided that the fewer the better.
Their domestic scene is quiet and low-key, almost Scandinavian
Look with white walls and smooth floors.
When you look at the house, you will find that you can be loyal to the crafts without being locked in your hands.
Crockery or lights thrown, it looks like it can use gasoline.
Stitchburys take time out of the work of the current program at POV this week-
Flying Dutch
Show how they bring art and craft styles into the 21 st century.
Their design goal is very simple and the result is great.
Minimalism, exquisite austerity.
\"We want to explain the arts and crafts, not the 1907 repetition,\" the award explained . \"
Former chairman and designer of UVic visual arts department.
On stage, Allen never tried to imitate a precise time period, nor did he try to imitate a slave-like reproduction: \"I want to commemorate a time period.
His goal here is the same: to reproduce the essence of arts and crafts, not what it looks like from the outside.
He explained that the movement was a reaction to the industrial revolution and featured a return
Furniture and traditional crafts.
\"Everything was unique in that era.
\"Alan is no stranger to working with his hands, and he believes that young cabinetmaker Jason is good at helping set the scene by building kitchen cabinets and other internal elements.
\"He is an extraordinary craftsman.
\"They also used Bruce Wilkin\'s design proposal within five months of renovating 2,100.
Squarefot House.
Although it is in good shape, some of the decor in the home is not to their taste.
\"The upstairs bathroom, for example, was an incredible example of the 1980 s: green and white tiles, golden fixtures, neo corner stuff, and the kitchen had a surplus of over 1960.
The floor began to peel off.
The door of the cabinet is about to fall.
\"One thing the owners like is the independent studio in the garage --
\"Very interested \"-
They also have Italian motorcycles here.
It\'s all about space and layout for Alan and Joanna.
They like things in the square.
Balance of have organization
\"Negative space is also important, which is why we choose things very carefully,\" Allen said . \".
\"We only introduce something that makes sense, not a lot of things.
The house is not very layered.
We don\'t have 85 pictures on the wall.
We are in the realm of minimalism.
\"He likened it to a big full show like The Flying Dutchman, where his secret is to represent an idea or make a suggestion with one or two things.
\"If you keep the space relatively calm, the audience can focus on the story.
It can be imagined by the audience.
\"After working all day, he and Joanne didn\'t want to be bombed at home.
\"Our nature is low-key, neutral, classic,\" said Joanne, a garment cutter and tailor, whose role in POV has been to turn the imagination of the garment designer into reality for the last 10 years.
\"I have a real feeling of home that attracts a lot from the surroundings.
I like to keep calm.
\"She is a modernist, fascinated by silhouette, shape and custom lines, and she sewed soft furniture for many families, such as kitchen blinds and lots of cushions.
For other windows, she chose fine white wool or linen to replenish the cloud-white walls.
\"We don\'t want to go too far --
Joanne said, \"decorate it . \" She admitted that she did like a little wonder at work.
That\'s why she likes the transition from drama to opera.
\"In opera, we do things on a larger scale.
The train will be longer when you make a ball dress, which is a luxury.
It is not as restrained as the theater, and the theater is more controlled.
\"She also enjoyed the transition from rural to urban life.
The couple used to live in Prospect Lake, but Joanne wanted to walk to work and it would take only half an hour from James Bay.
She also appreciates the quality of light in her new home, the flow and feel of the House, the surroundings nearby and the proximity to the water.
She also likes her new dressing room.
\"We took out an old cabinet and added a built-in one.
In the bookcase next to the chimney, something used to highlight the room.
This is a raw brick. we painted it white.
They added two high closets and a long drawer under the window.
There are a few big bowls on the table-
Alan said with a smile, \"she has a bowl of things --\"
One is the whirlpool of the scarf and the other is the sample of the curtain fabric.
They painted all the walls, added new fixtures, occupied all the carpets that were nailed together, nailed together, polished the floor and in the bathroom
But the kitchen is where the biggest shift takes place.
It looks like a craft, so they decided to follow the spirit, but there is a more open concept and custom cabinets.
During the fix, Joanne enjoyed watching the interaction between Alan and their designer.
\"We came into contact with Bruce Wilkin because we have seen his work and he has a great understanding of modern art and craftsmanship and a solid understanding of the structure.
\"We are used to working with artists and designers in theater and song shows, and we had a wonderful experience with Bruce.
\"Wilkin also loves the project and fits into their style by going to Calgary to see the plays designed by Allen.
\"It\'s spectacular and symmetrical, and the rhythm of repetition and balance is great.
\"They are all very creative and I don\'t always work with people like this.
Allen has a real vision and clear idea of space.
Joanne has a lot of interest in fabrics, but they need someone who has skills in architecture. .
For example, they want to make a flat beam by cutting the floor support beam to remove the walls of the kitchen, which we did through surgery.
He says the results are unique.
\"I don\'t think Victoria has another kitchen like it.
The method is very modern.
No cabinet;
The whole back wall is tiled;
Hanging stainless steel shelves with dark lights inside;
Instead of hardware, all the handles were cut off.
There is a great sense of craftsmanship. an Amish look.
\"It\'s a perfect choice for owners who often hold dinner parties for 20 to 30 people, which is a terrible prospect for most people.
\"But 20 is easier to do than 10 because everyone takes care of themselves,\" Allen said . \" He invented an extensible table in his former home.
The new owner who purchased the last house asked to keep the table, so Allen had to design something new before their next big party.
Joanne joked, \"but they will come if he builds it . \" He added that they often preside overof-
The people of the town theater, because, \"We used to be in this location and know how it feels.
\"Beautiful House \".
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